Shooting Video in Flight

I have come to really enjoy recording video in flight and then editing it later. It’s been pretty fun to see some of the results and to share it online. If you’ve wondered how to do it yourself, here’s an article that lays out some of the tricks behind a good in-flight video.

https://backcountrypilot.org/photo-and-video/how-to-shoot-video

Here’s a video that I put together a few months ago.

High Altitude Flying – Flying Magazine

I usually spend a fair portion of my flight day between 10,000′ and 13,000′ in a non-pressurized aircraft. Hypoxia is a normal part of life at those altitudes. Take at few minutes to read this great article from Flying Magazine and refresh your knowledge on high altitude flying.

via High-Altitude Flying: What You Need to Know | Flying Magazine

Airstrip Focus – Silimo

I fly to Silimo at least once at week and sometime almost daily. It’s a short 15-18 minute flight from Wamena as long as the weather is good. Its short but not very steep. The hardest part about the runway is that the abort point is over half a mile away from the touchdown point. That means that once you’ve passed that point you have to land or accept an accident.

I’ve had my fair share of fun in Silimo, and even a few scary moments. Generally though I thoroughly enjoy flying there. The folks on the ground are friendly and there’s a deep missional history there. That history wasn’t always so friendly though. In fact, it started with an ambush.

Years ago a missionary who was looking for a certain village was attacked by the local tribe. He had hiked into the valley and the men were waiting there for him. When he realized what was happening, he did the last thing his attackers expected.

He laid down. Lying there on the rocks and mud he told them he wouldn’t stop them from killing him because he loved them. The spears and arrows never flew.

Now, that man’s son visits Silimo regularly continuing on the work his father started. Creating an alphabet for the tribe, teaching them to read, giving them a school, bringing access to medical care, establishing a church, and giving them the Bible in their own language.

Like many villages in Papua, Silimo’s history of connection to the modern world starts with a western missionary appearing in their village. The history continued with the construction of the airstrip. And now, I’m helping write that story as I fly to those villages. Reflecting on this makes me hope I can write¬†a chapter for these villages in the example of that first missionary, one of love and care.

 

Delayed Again

A few weeks ago I bent over to grab my backpack. I was about to put the last few things into it that I needed for my flight day. The sun was streaming in the window promising a good day for my PPC/ICC (pilot proficiency check/instrument competency check).

It wasn’t to happen however. As I reached for my backpack, something gave way in my back. I’d had back pain in the past, and usually it went away in a couple minutes, or even a few hours. This pain didn’t just go away.

After sitting on the couch a bit, I texted my chief pilot with whom I was to fly. I explained what was happening as my back grew more and more painful. He told me to take it easy and rest. We could do the check flights on Monday. Since it was Friday, we wouldn’t lose much time and I’d have the weekend to recover.

That was four weeks ago. Since then I’ve learned that I’d not just pulled a muscle, but I had a herniated disc in my back. Much of the time since then I’ve been laying on my back in bed waiting. Now, after several weeks of recovery time doing gentle exercises at the direction of a physical therapist, I’m able to move about on my own somewhat. I still can’t bend over however, and sitting or standing for more than a few minutes rapidly becomes uncomfortable and even painful.

I’m not sure what’s next. Hopefully in a couple more weeks I’ll be able to return to work to a limited degree, and maybe even start flying a bit here and there. It could also be that I’ll end up needing to travel for more extensive medical care. Right now, all I can do is wait.

Regardless of what’s to happen though, I’ve been feeling generally quite positive. I’ve had more time to read, catch up on some thank-you notes, play some games, read to my kids, and even write some blog entries. It’s been a good, if somewhat boring few weeks.

What are some things that you would suggest to fill my time? Perhaps you have a book to recommend or an activity you’ve used to pass the time while bed-ridden?